logo


Heath Campbell, Adolf Hitler-Naming Dad, Dressed In Nazi Uniform To New Jersey Custody Hearing

First Posted: 06/04/13 EDT Updated: 06/04/13 EDT

Heath Campbell entered a New Jersey courthouse Monday dressed in a full Nazi uniform, donning a trimmed mustache reminiscent of Adolf Hitler -- the man he named his firstborn child after.

The 40-year-old dad was attending a hearing to ask for visitation rights to his youngest child, 2-year-old Heinrich Hons, who was taken into state custody just hours after his birth in 2011.

Henrich's three Nazi-named siblings -- Adolf Hitler, 7, JoyceLynn Aryan Nation, 6, and 5-year-old Honzlynn Jeannie -- had already been placed in foster care in 2009. The move came a month after the family gained national attention when a ShopRite refused to write "Happy Birthday Adolf Hitler" on a birthday cake.

On Monday before the hearing, Campbell told NBC10, "The world needs to see who I am," when asked what his strategy was in wearing the controversial outfit. "I'm going to tell the judge, I love my children. I wanna be a father, let me be it."

In August 2010, an appeals court ruled that evidence of domestic violence justified the state's decision to remove the children from the Campbell home, according to ABC News.

A year ago, a New Jersey Superior Court judge decided Campbell and his wife, Deborah -- who've since separated -- could not have their children back.

Campbell has always maintained that his kids were taken solely because of their names.

"These kids weren't abused," he told The Star-Ledger after the 2012 decision, adding, "If I have to give up my Nazism, then so be it. I'll do it."

A month later, he created a new Nazi organization, "Hitler's Order," according to NBC10, and began wearing the uniform.

Campbell originally told The Associated Press in 2008 that he named his son after Adolf Hitler because he liked the name and "no one else in the world would have [it]."

The media were not allowed inside the court room because of New Jersey family court proceedings policy.

Any decision made by the judge would not be made public by the court, according to Ledger.